Sunday, 22 May 2011

Silks, pure and artifical


The third and last part on the fabric list, here are the party stuff! I hope you have enjoyed it!


Lace
Drape: Heavy or crisp
Uses: Evening gowns, short and long.
Notes: Doesn’t wrinkle, practical.
Georgette
Drape: Heavy
Uses: Evening gowns, bridal maids, middle-fine dresses
Notes: Dull surface.
Transparent velvet
Drape: Heavy
Uses: Evening gowns
Notes: Fragile. Choose models with few seams. Very lightweight, soft velvet with fairly short pile. When held up to light it can be seen through.
Taffeta
Drape: Crisp
Uses: The best quality: evenings gowns, blouses. Lower quality: slips.
Crepe satin
Drape: Heavy
Uses: Evening gowns, long and short and more elegant underwear
Notes: When dyed the surface becomes dull and ugly of the true silk, something that don’t happen if it is artificial silk.
Atlas silk
Drape: Crisp
Uses: Evening gown, bridal gowns
Notes: Shiny surface
Moire
Drape: Crisp
Uses: Evening gowns, suits, decorations on wool
Notes: The surface may be damaged when dry cleaned if not the utmost care is taken. And most definitely will disappear if it gets washed in water.



Cloqué
Drape: Heavy
Uses: Evening gowns, long and short
Matelassé
Drape: Heavy
Uses: Evening gowns, long and short
Moss crepe
Drape: Heavy
Uses: Dresses
Notes. Doesn’t wrinkle. If the weave is too loose it may snag.
Ribbed silk
Drape: Crisp
Uses: Suits, hats, accessories
Brocade
Drape: Heavy
Uses: Evening gowns, evening coats
Notes: Shiny or dull surface. May have metallic threads.
Chiffon
Drape: Lightweight
Uses: Evening gowns
Notes: Solid colours or patterned with flowers. Doesn’t wrinkle.
Organza
Drape: Crisp
Uses: Evening gowns
Notes: Shiny surface
Marocain
Drape: Heavy
Uses: Suits, all kinds of dresses
Notes: Dull surface. Doesn’t wrinkle.
Crepe de chine
Drape: Heavy
Uses: Evenings gowns, slips
Notes: Solid or patterned
Taffeta, Panné and Chiffon velvet
Drape: Heavy
Uses: Evening gowns
Notes: Fragile. Choose a pattern with few seams. Chiffon Velvet, lightweight soft velvet with short, thick pile. On close examination pile appears to form narrow stripes. Silk or synthetic (nylon, etc) pile. Panne Velve, satin rich appearance created by pressing pile in one direction and passing it over steamed rollers. It seems likely to me that Taffeta velvet is the same thing as Silk velvet.
Metallic fabrics, such as lace (cotton or silk), lame and brocade
Drape: Heavy
Uses: Evening gown, evening coats, exclusive tea gowns
Notes: Keep away from sunlight and rubber.

I don't claim that this is a complete list of fabrics used and if something is missing, I would love to hear it.

Thank you Molly for additional information on velvets. More info in her comment.

4 comments:

Molly said...

101 on velvets:

Silk velvet - silk background, silk pile

Cotton Back Velvet - cotton background, silk or synthetic pile. Note Cotton Velvet is velveteen - cotton yarns cut to a short pile and brushed.

Chiffon Velvet - lightweight soft velvet with short, thick pile. On close examination pile appears to form narrow stripes. Silk or synthetic (nylon, etc) pile.

Transparent Velvet - very lightweight, soft velvet with fairly short pile. When held up to light it can be seen through. So it is different to Devore which is a burn-out fabric (chemicals applied to remove the nap in a pattern).

Lyons Velvet - heavy, crisp, closely woven, stiff fabric with erect, short, thick, pile. Cotton or silk back and silk or synthetic pile.

Brocade Velvet / Faconne Velvet - this is burn-out fabric like Devore.

Panne Velvet - Satin rich appearance created by pressing pile in one direction and passing it over steamed rollers.

Crushed Velvet - Fabric is placed between rollers but the pile is not pressed in one direction so it creates a variation of pile directions creating the mixed effect of the fabric.

Embossed/Sculptured Velvet - has a raised design, some parts of the pile are taller than other parts creating the pattern effect.

Moireed Velvet - Fabric is passed through rollers which have design engraved on them which is transferred to the fabric.

Some useeful velvet notes:

Acetate and nylon pile are naturally crush resistant. Silk and rayon velves crush easily so may have chemical treatment to minimalise this.

Heat, pressure and moisture (i.e. steam pressing/ironing) can remove pattern finished from velvet.

I'm not a velvet nut, my notes have come from a dry-cleaning manual! Hope you find it of interest, I've greatly enjoyed reading your fabric lists and learned quite a bit myself. I hope you had fun translating it, I've translated some Japanese patterns in the past and love the puzzle challenge!

Isis said...

Molly: Thank you for the velvet info!

I had great fun translating it, though at times a bit challenging. I can imagine translating Japanese can be tricky- though of course if one speaks the language it's not that hard. :)

Molly said...

No probs, my book is very informative and you don't see this info in many places. Your post has me thinking a lot more about fabric choices and purpose already!

I can't speak/read Japanese, I put together a crib-sheet of translated symbols then matched them up to the instructions using some creative thinking occasionally, its just like a word puzle. Google translate is really helpful! Eventually you start to recognise the common symbols. The Japanese do some lovely pattern books so its worth the effort.

Isis said...

Molly. No indeed! Some of these fabrics are completely new to me and I have been interested in fabrics all my life. If I could get back in time I would choose a well-stocked fabric store. :)

I see. More useful than doing Sudoku. ;)

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